Welcome to British Birds

British Birds publishes ground-breaking articles on identification, distribution, migration, conservation and taxonomy, and is the place to report significant ornithological sightings and events. The publication is widely regarded as the bird journal of record in Great Britain.

Published monthly, British Birds is an invaluable resource for birders and professional ornithologists. Contributors include both professionals and keen amateurs. Content is always abreast of current ideas and thinking, yet written in a clear and simple style that is easy to interpret.

BB cover April 14

What’s in the latest issue? April 2014

  • BB eye
  • News & comment
  • The migration of Common and Arctic Terns in southern England
  • What it’s like to be a bird
  • Spring migration routes of Long-tailed Skuas in the UK 
  • Notes
  • Letters
  • Obituary
  • Reviews
  • Recent reports
  • Talking point
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Avian Urban Ecology: behavioural and physiological adaptations

Peregrine Falcons Falco peregrinus nesting on city buildings are a recent and well-known urban success story but relatively few birds have adapted to this concrete, noisy and brightly lit environment. In Avian Urban Ecology the editors have brought together 27 biologists to review the characteristics that help birds to successfully colonise urbanised areas and the consequences of this lifestyle…

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Owls

Book reviews // 15.04.2014

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Owls

Although not apparent from the title, this volume is a natural history of the British owls with the focus primarily on our five widespread species. Snowy Owl and Eurasian Eagle Owl are also dealt with, and there are very brief accounts for the three species to have made it here as vagrants…

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Predictions of increased coastal flooding and sea level rise caused by climate change could spell disaster for Little Terns…

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Climate change is altering species’ distributions and populations. What is less clear is how and why. The latest BTO research shows that the main driver of change might actually occur through altered interactions between species, rather than direct responses to climate…

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Common Guillemot bridling survey 2014

It is now more than 30 years since Tim Birkhead coordinated a survey of the frequency of bridling in Common Guillemots (Birkhead, T. R. 1984. Journal of Zoology 202: 165–176). Given the population and environmental changes that have occurred since then it seems timely to undertake another major survey…

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Birds of New Zealand: a photographic guide

A recent survey of regular travellers saw New Zealand voted as the world’s best country to visit, and having visited the country three times, I have to agree that it is a very special place. One can only wonder what it was like before the arrival of humans and the subsequent loss of over 40 endemic bird species…

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For the first time ever, over 3,500 maps showing the distribution, range change and abundance for over five hundred different species of bird that have been recorded in Britain and Ireland since 1968 are freely available online…

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The Bernard Tucker Memorial Lecture 2013: what it’s like to be a bird

By Tim Birkhead Abstract The study of behaviour, much of it based on birds, became established in the first half of the twentieth century. At that time researchers were anxious that this new area of research should be both distinct and objective. They set clear boundaries about what was and what wasn’t appropriate to study. [...]

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