Eagles, Hawks and Falcons of the World. By Leslie Brown and Dean Amadon. Hamlyn (for Country Life), Feltham, Middlesex, 1968. Two volumes in slip case: 945 pages including 165 bird plates (most in colour), one egg plate (in colour), 15 underwing plates, 94 maps and 33 other text-figures. £15.75. As long ago as 1924-36 H. K. Swann published his Monograph on the Birds of Prey and then in 1964 M. L. Grossman and J. Hamlet followed with their Birds of Prey of the World (reviewed in Brit. Birds, 58: 193195). Thus the present book is the third in line, but it breaks much new ground and largely complements the 1964 one: the main concept of that was the visual impact of its photographs, whereas Mr Brown and Dr Amadon have made their text the all-important part; they have also excluded the owls. The first 150 pages of the first volume, forming part 1, are devoted to an Introduction and 18 chapters on Classification and distribution, Physical attributes and senses, Plumage and moult, The daily cycle, Flight, Migration, Hunting methods and speed, Food consumption and the r61e of birds of prey as predators, Territory, Display, Nests and nest-building, Eggs and incubation, Development of the young, Care of the young, The post-fledging period, Breeding success and productivity, Longevity, mortality and enemies, and Hawks and Man. These have had to be greatly condensed and, as a result, some seem a little inadequate. I was disappointed in the chapters dealing with territory, nests and
Volume: 
Issue 11
Authors: 
Amadon, D
Richardson, C
Amadon, D
Richardson, C

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