The Natural History of Europe. By Harry Garms. Illustrated by Wilhelm Eigener. Edited by A. Melderis (plants) and Joyce Pope (animals). Paul Hamlyn, London, 1967. i x + 3 5 8 pages with 900 illustrations. 35s. This bulky book--11 by 7J inches in size, i f inches thick and 42 ounces in weight--describes and illustrates in colour approximately 2,100 plants (of all sorts) and 1,400 animals (of all sorts). The colours, although flat, are generally good and the miniature drawings are, everything considered, successful. The area covered is vast, stretching from the sub-tropics of the Mediterranean to the Arctic Circle, and is grouped into seven terrains, from seashore to mountains. It follows, inevitably, that very many more thousands of organisms which will be met with are not included. The question arises forcibly: for whom is this book intended? The blurb claims that it will be equally valuable for amateur and specialist. N o specialist, however modest, could be content with the treatment of his particular subject, but for the man in the street I think that this book has something. It may have something too for those who want to know roughly the identification of an organism outside their own line of country, whether it be fungus, fish or flower. O n this basis it might be worth readers of British Birds looking at it to see if they could not glean the odd clue in sections in which they may be unversed. What information is there, in an extremely
Volume: 
Issue 3
Authors: 
Jones, P. H
Jones, P. H
McClintock, D
Jones, P. H
McClintock, D

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