In Search of Birds. By Collingwood Ingram. Witherby, London, 1966. 286 pages. 30s. This is a colourful patchwork quilt of sixty years' and a very good thirty shillings' worth of ornithological observations, experiences and ruminations, which no one with even a jot of Captain Ingram's enthusiasm for birds could fail to enjoy. Wherever he has been--and it is not at all easy to spot the gaps in the kaleidoscope, though in fact they include (rather refreshingly) the bulk of tropical Africa and all except a generous central slice of the Americas--he has looked at birds with an admirable mixture of aesthetic wonderment and scientific inquisitiveness (two attitudes of mind which are not really so very far apart). What is more, he has succeeded in transferring from his notebooks to his journals, and thence to this book, an always fresh and lively impression of what he has seen, enjoyed, deduced or conjectured. The result is essentially readable, with no ambition at all to be a treatise, and it is consistent with this that the book ends simply with a list of the 367 species mentioned in the text (in alphabetical order of vernacular names, with scientific names in brackets) rather than with an index. Nevertheless, it would undoubtedly have been a convenience to anyone wanting to turn up one of the many references of historical interest or challenging implications, if the list had included page numbers. There are also a few curious slips (e.g. mirasmas for marismas, guardkn for gardieri) which
Volume: 
Issue 2
Authors: 
Cramp, S
Komolphalin, K
Cramp, S
Komolphalin, K
Cramp, S
Komolphalin, K

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