By G. V. T. MATTHEWS (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1955). (Cambridge Monographs in Experimental Biology, No. 3). v i i + 1 4 1 pages, with text figures. 12s. 6d. T H I S is an excellent and very readable short account of a subject in which important advances have been made in recent years. Dr. Matthews is well qualified to discuss the problem, by reason of his own contribution to its experimental study and of his comprehensive knowledge of the relevant literature. He displays a capacity for lucid exposition, in a simple direct style with effective diagrammatic illustration. The result is a clear and compact statement. The book opens with a summary of the known facts of migration which bear on the particular problem; and this is followed by a statement of the evidence that bearing-and-distance navigation on the part of birds is an actuality. Next there is a critical evaluation of homing experiments, their methods and results; this leads to the evidence for the reality of a type of complete navigation which enables the bird to fly towards a known goal irrespective of its bearing and distance. Thus, in four chapters the problem is set. The remainder of the book discusses the physical features of the environment which are concerned in navigation, and the sensory equipment needed to react to such stimuli. Successive chapters deal with theories based, respectively, on maintenance of sensory contact with home, on a " g r i d " derived from the
Volume: 
Issue 12
Authors: 
Thomson, A. L
M, G. R
Thomson, A. L
G, D
M, G. R
Thomson, A. L
G, D
M, G. R

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