Letters

01 December 1964
Comments Letters SIRS,--While not seeking to prolong this correspondence unduly, for there is more than a grain of truth on either side, I feel that some reply is called for to Mr. Reginald Wagstaffe's letter (antea, pp. 319-320). May I point out at once that I do not dis...
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Notes

01 November 1963
Comments Notes IT has long been known that, in the Common Crossbill (Loxia curvirostra) the mandibles cross indifferently on either side in different individuals. Recently, however, for a special purpose, I desired to ascertain whether or not individuals having the man...
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Notes

01 May 1963
Comments Notes FOE some years now I have been paying particular attention to the nestlings of common birds. It is of course now known to all ornithologists that the parents keep the nest clean (as a general rule) by carrying away the excrement, and often by swallowing ...
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Notes

01 April 1963
Comments Notes W E have received a good many schedules relating to these two inquiries (see Vol. VI., pp. 296-311, and Vol. VII, pp. 4-6), but we sincerely hope that many more of our readers will send in particulars. This should now be done without delay, and if the fo...
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Notes

01 June 1948
Comments Notes As a member of the local fire brigade I was able to make some close observations on the behaviour of birds at a big oil-tank fire at Pembroke Dock in August and September, 1940. The fire blazed for many days and gave rise to intense heat and an immense c...
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Letters

01 April 1948
Comments Letters SIRS,--Messrs. Wagstaffe and Williamson's paper (antea, Vol. xl, p p . 322-325), on t h e cabinet colour changes in bird skins, will be read b y all workers in systematic ornithology with great interest. That these changes occur is of course well known, a...
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Notes

01 November 1947
Comments Notes ON a fine morning in April, 1946, a number of Blackbirds (Turdus m. merula), Song-Thrushes (Turdus e. ericetorum) and Starlings (Siurnus v. vulgaris) were watched while feeding on a large lawn of King's College, Cambridge. The Starlings spent most of the...
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