British Birds August 2019

Published on 03 August 2019 in Latest issues

The migrations of British Common Sandpipers  The migrations of Common Sandpipers are described by combining ringing data with findings from a geolocator study in Highland Scotland. Potential reasons for the decline in numbers of Common Sandpipers are discussed, including drought in staging areas and unfavourable winds during northward migration.

Report on scarce migrant birds in Britain in 2017 This report summarises the non-passerine scarce migrant birds recorded in Britain in 2017. Several wetland and seabird species appeared in record, or near-record numbers, though the factors influencing each species appear to differ. Black-winged Stilt makes its first appearance in this report, with a record 59 birds; while Cattle Egret, with a staggering 737 birds, has now become too widespread to monitor accurately and makes its final appearance. Lesser Scaup and Alpine Swift remain among the rarest species in this section of the report.

Some observations of nesting Grasshopper Warblers in west Cumbria, with particular reference to double-brooding  The Grasshopper Warbler is usually single-brooded in the north of Britain. Results from a long-term study show that, after a successful first brood, it is clearly not unusual for Grasshopper Warblers in Cumbria to be double-brooded. Local studies can still add new knowledge about the breeding biology of our familiar species.

The Carl Zeiss Award 2019  Since 1992, The Carl Zeiss Award has been presented to acknowledge exceptional submissions to the British Birds Rarities Committee, and currently, the award is given for the best overall submission. The winner is revealed in the August issue

BB eye  The Red Kite reintroduction: 30 years on

My patch Walthamstow Wetlands

News & comment,Book reviews and Recent reports complete the August issue.

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