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THE death of Professor Newton, which took place at Cambridge on the 7th of June last, creates a void in the ranks of British Ornithologists which it will be impossible to fill….

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IN the first number of this Magazine (see page 23), Dr. Sclater asks for information about the British Willow Tit, which he calls a SUPPOSED new British Tit. Like all the wider…

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FOR the readers of BRITISH B I R D S I have been asked to supply an outline of the accessions to the British List since the completion of the 2nd edition…

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is perhaps fitting that the first number of BRITISH BIBDS should, contain an account of a “bird which, as a breeding species in these islands, is reduced to a solitary pair or…

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HOWARD SAOTBERS, In his ” Manual of British Birds,” includes five species of true Parus in the British Avifauna, namely, Parus major, P, ater, P. palusiris, P. cosruleus, and P. eristatus.. Dr….

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was always one of the chief delights of my boyhood, so when, some ten years ago, I settled down in this country–comparatively speaking–after having spent a quarter of a century of my…

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(circa 1500–1568). THE history of British ornithology may be said to commence from the time of William Turner, famous both as a naturalist and an author. Born just 400 years ago, this…

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O N April 1st, 1908, an example of one of the ” Dovelike Fulmars ” was found dead under a tree near Tarporley, Cheshire, b y a man who attends the weekly…

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There are three means of identification–(1) the eggs themselves ; (2) the down found in the nests ; (3) the feathers which are generally mixed with the down. The last provides by…

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(Continued from Vol. L, page 350.) FLAMINGO Phcenicopterus roseus Pall. S. page 395. [On November 22nd, 1902, a Flamingo was shot on the Wash ; on November 5th, 1904, another was seen…

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