Book reviews

Produced on behalf of the Nottinghamshire Birdwatchers, this is the first avifauna of the county since 1975, so is long overdue. Its scope is the birds recorded in the county up to and including 2013 but it also has a chapter on notable additions in 2014–18, meaning it is very much up to date…

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This book is an extremely attractive publication, which has been produced with a wonderful eye for detail, precision and accuracy. It will be immensely valuable to all naturalists, planners and developers…

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For me, the first edition of Moult and Ageing of European Passerines (or simply ‘Jenni & Winkler’, which it is usually referred to as) has been one of the most important ornithological references in my library…

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The Common Buzzard is a success story. It is an adaptable bird with a varied, flexible diet and, as persecution has become less of a problem, it has been able to take full advantage of our modern landscapes. It is Britain’s most abundant raptor and…

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If you’re planning a trip to North America and you’re into gulls, you’ll find this a really accessible book that will help you to make the most of your experience out there. If you have a passion for gulls in Britain, then I also thoroughly recommend this book. The combination of simple approach, brilliant photos and the readable style encourages all birders to dip their toes into the wonderful world of gulls!

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Birders often choose where to live based, in part, on the opportunities for watching wildlife. The proximity of high-quality wildlife sites might be your greatest priority. Or perhaps the potential of a wildlife garden would be the most important factor. Simon Barnes manages to have it both ways…

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This is the latest offering in the Lynx and BirdLife International Field Guides Collection and covers all of the West Indies except Trinidad & Tobago and the Netherlands Antilles…

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This new photographic identification guide to the world’s pelagic birds is a comprehensive, authoritative and impressive volume…

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The subject of rewilding has received wide publicity recently, yet not too long ago this concept was familiar to just a handful of enthusiasts. It is the notion of taking large parts of the countryside and letting much of it revert back to what it looked like before either the agricultural or the industrial revolution. To many people this is just a fanciful idea that simply will not happen, because too few people really care about wildlife and because governments will always seek to please the majority and take decisions that reduce our national debt. However, within the rewilding model is an overall message that if we think only on a small scale, we will never manage to maintain habitats that support many of our currently declining bird species…

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Ospreys are, by and large, a good news story. They are recovering rapidly from past declines caused by persecution and the harmful effects of pesticides. Humans now help, rather than hinder, by putting up platforms to increase nesting opportunities and, increasingly, by translocating young birds to speed up their return to areas from which they have been lost…

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