Book reviews

Most birders will have heard of Frances Willughby through his association with John Ray and their joint publication ‘Ornithology’…

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David Tipling’s work will be well-known to most BB readers and a quick check back through the years shows him being a finalist in the BB Bird Photograph of the Year competition six times between 1991 and 2001, after which he was appointed as one of the judges. Over the years, his work has evolved, from photographing many of Britain’s most memorable vagrants, to expeditions to far-flung regions…

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As one who has lived in North Wales for over 30 years and with an interest in rare birds since the early 1970s, this book was eagerly awaited. For the first time, details of all rare and scarce birds (defined as those that occur on average five times or fewer annually in Wales) recorded in the vice-counties of Flint, Denbigh, Caernarfon, Anglesey and Meirionnydd are brought together in one volume…

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This is the follow-up to the same authors’ Behind the Binoculars published in 2015 (Brit. Birds 108: 552–553), which this reviewer referred to as ‘a print version of Desert Island Discs with a very specific category of castaway’…

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Curlew Moon

Book reviews // 11.05.2018

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Mary Colwell wrote Curlew Moon to help raise awareness of the plight of the Eurasian Curlew. This is an iconic but rapidly declining species – one of the world’s eight curlews, most of them faring very badly in the modern world, with two species probably already extinct…

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World year-listing is not entirely new as a challenge, although it has become more competitive in recent years. But no matter how keen you are, there is nearly always someone who is keener still, and in 2015 Noah Strycker set himself another goal: to become the first person to see half the world’s birds in one year. His haul of 6,042 species and how he managed to achieve it is the subject of this book…

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Some books impress the reader more by their very existence than by their quality, and a few impress equally on both counts. This is one of those books…

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This lavish, large-format regional atlas compares the results of three tetrad-based surveys of breeding birds carried out in the London Natural History Society (LNHS) recording area…

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Excluding accounts that appeared as parts of more general works (such as the Victoria County History series), around 40 county avifaunas appeared in book form from the midpoint of Queen Victoria’s reign in 1866 to the end of the Edwardian era in 1910. That Shropshire was not among this great wave of local avifaunas was due to the untimely death, from cirrhosis of the liver on 1st July 1892, of William Beckwith…

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I am pleased to say that Hetty Saunders’ book does not disappoint, and is required reading for anyone interested in Baker, his book, and story-telling around nature themes…

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